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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Shooting in low light


I am going to explain how to employ the useful techniques of using a flashlight with a pistol, especially useful for those flashlights that have a tactical switch.

As many of the members already have a Surefire of two or three batteries with a tactical switch or a similar one of another brand, going from 60 to 200 lumens, I am going to explain the two most popular techniques. One is the Harries which I have already explained in the previous post in conjunction with the Borealis 1050 lumens light.

The Harries technique





Michael Harries invented this position and it is considered one of the first positions ever that coordinates the use of the flashlight using the two hands.
For using with tactical switch lights (with a switch in the tail), the flashlight is grasped with the left hand around the body and the thumb will activate the switch.
For lights with switch on the top (as the Magcharger, Stinger and Borealis) the index finger is used to press the switch down without clicking it on (if you drop your light you don’t want it to illuminate you)
The back of the hands are pressed together and maintain an isometric tension to help control the recoil of the gun. Your wrists will be crossed and the light will be parallel or close to the muzzle of the gun.

The Roger-Surefire




Holster maker, ex FBI agent, and competition shooter Bill Rogers teamed up with Surefire to adapt a rubber grommet or washer to the Surefire 6 Z (now available in most combat models of Surefire and copied by others light makers).
The position is also called the cigar position, as you grasp the body of the flashlight like a cigar, with the index and middle finger. The tail cap is resting on the fleshy part below your thumb and a little pressure back on the rubber ring will activate the light (the tail cap button resting in that part below your thumb will switch the light on).
That position will let you grasp the hand shooting the pistol with three fingers of the left hand, and it is the only position that let you use a two-handed grip on the gun

The Chapman technique




Ray Chapman was the first IPSC world champion. He invented his position for use with the Kel-Lites of the 1970’s (probably the first high quality Police Flashlight) that have a sliding switch on top of the barrel. It is still a great position to use for those that don’t want to cross the wrists as in the Harries position when using a big flashlight.
It is well suited for the Maglites or Stingers and for the modification of the Maglite like the Borealis 1050 lumens flashlight.

You just grasp the flashlight as you usually do, with your thumb in the switch and your fingers circling the barrel and you bring it up to index your fingernails with the fingernails of the shooting hand.

In my other post I have mentioned the old FBI technique which is to separate the flashlight high and away from you in order to confuse you opponent about your position.
Another technique that doesn’t offer any support to the shooting hand but it can be very useful when using a pistol with lousy sights (original 1911, Luger, etc) is the one I used more than 40 years ago when I started combat shooting.
It indexes the light on top of my head, letting the light fall on a line from the sights to the target. Even the minuscule back up .380 or the Baby Browning sights gets illuminated using this ridiculous position.

In closing, I would like to say that in my opinion lights with less than 60 lumens are out of the new low light fighting techniques.
For my belt light I will prefer to have a minimum of 200 lumens, using the Surefire C-3 and the P-91 lamp as my favorite.
But if I have to clear a big room, warehouse or backyard, I prefer a light with more power. My Surefire M-6 with the 500 lumens lamp will do, but I prefer even more lumens to really blind, disorient, and roast my opponent. That is when I use the Borealis 1050 lumens light.

These positions I have shown here will work with big lights too (except for the cigar position), the thing you will have to remember is that when you need a light in a hairy situation you need it badly and that two is better than one, so a big light in your hand to blind you opponent and another smaller light in your belt as a back up is better than only one. (two is one and one is none).

Cheers
Black Bear
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
POLAR BEAR POSITION


Here I am back again to show a new position, is to be used with my new light the POLAR BEAR 426 lumens, and the BEAR CUB, 220 lumens for 90 minutes. The Polar Bear 426 lumens compete with the Surefire M-4 (350 lumens 20 minutes run on four 123's batteries)
My Polar Bear is rechargeable so the runtime of 75 minutes is FREE, before the Surefire M-4 can run 75 minutes will have spend $32.00 in batteries

Here are the two lights:





And the position is like the Rogers-Surefire in what you hold the flashlight like a cigar, between index and middle finger, the index also activate the switch momentarily or click, as you wish and this position permits TWO HANDS ON THE GUN (The only position that permits it, beside the Rogers-Surefire)








Respectfully
Black Bear
 

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shooting with a flashlight, for me is essentially one handed shooting, (I have very small hands) alot of cadets in my class had trouble understanding that. The method I prefer for several reasons is the FBI style.

It may look unconventional and downright silly, but it worked for me very well. The basis behind it is that criminals will shoot at the light, that have your light source near nothing vital. I've used the Harries for building search/room clearing scenarios, but prefer the fbi style, or my personal adaptation of it for outdoor/open area usage.
 

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Bobula said:
shooting with a flashlight, for me is essentially one handed shooting, (I have very small hands) alot of cadets in my class had trouble understanding that. The method I prefer for several reasons is the FBI style.

It may look unconventional and downright silly, but it worked for me very well. The basis behind it is that criminals will shoot at the light, that have your light source near nothing vital. I've used the Harries for building search/room clearing scenarios, but prefer the fbi style, or my personal adaptation of it for outdoor/open area usage.

I have seen this method used many times and understood the reasoning behind it, as it is logical in most situations, especially if someone is shooting at you... Though I've never tried it. Stupid range has limits on shooting and wont allow it. Next time I'm shooting in low light at the academy I'll try it, even though they probably don't teach it or advise it.

Anyway, thanks for reminding me about it.


Also, like Jeremy, most of my pistols have rails and use M6 or M6 variants. As much as people hate lasers, I like using them for fast target acquisition. I have very large hands (I'm 6'6"), but I'm pretty lazy and like to minimize human error.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
And here is the reverse Harries, it is advocated by one shooting school, it will offer the unlocking of the wrists, but you have to be careful of placing the light well to the right, out of the recoiling slide of auto-pistols.

Here Kevin is demostrating the technique.



Black Bear
 
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