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Do you have a hunters license?

  • Yes, I have a hunters license

    Votes: 5 62.5%
  • No, I do not nor do I care/plan to secure one

    Votes: 1 12.5%
  • No, I do not though I do care/plan to secure one

    Votes: 2 25.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)


July 10, 2006--New Hunting/Sporting License Purchase Law -- Effective January 1, 2007 new legislation was signed that requires first time hunting or sporting license (combination hunting and fishing) buyers to produce a certificate showing they have passed a basic hunter education course or show a hunting or sporting license from any previous year and/or any state or province. The recent legislation now reinstates the hunter education requirement that had been in place prior to major gun law changes in 1998. See the above link for answers to any questions you may have.

Mission Statement
It is the mission of the Massachusetts Hunter Education Program to protect the lives and safety of the public, promote the wise management and ethical use of our wildlife resource, and encourage a greater appreciation of the environment through education. The Hunter Education Program is a public education effort providing instruction in the safe handling of firearms and other outdoor activities related to hunting and firearm use. Funding is derived from the sale of hunting and sporting licenses, and from federal excise taxes on firearms and archery equipment. Massachusetts offered its first hunter safety course in 1954, and to date has graduated more than 160,000 students. The program is administered by the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, and courses are taught by certified volunteer instructors. Any person regardless of race, gender, citizenship or handicap may participate. Persons under 18 years of age must obtain written permission of parent or guardian in order to attend. With advance notification, the program will attempt to provide language translators or assistance for those with handicaps. Successful completion of a written or verbal exam is required in all Hunter Education Program courses.

In order to purchase a hunting or sporting license in any state, Canada and Mexico, all first time hunters must have a government-issued Basic Hunter Education Certificate. Such a certificate is earned by the successful completion of a Massachusetts Basic Hunter Education Course and is accepted in any state, Canada and Mexico. Some jurisdictions also require archery hunters, blackpowder hunters or trappers to successfully complete a government sponsored courses as well.

All courses are conducted free of charge.

http://www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/dfwhuntr.htm
http://www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/education/education_home.htm
http://www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/education/hed/hed_course_desc.htm

- Janq

Reason for edit: The site URLs have been revised by MA Wildlife since the time that I first posted this thread.
 

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I think that's a good call, when I got my first hunting license in 2004 or so, all I had to do was show my LTC.

It's good that hunters learn ethical hunting, land owner's rights, why there are seasons for various crittres, etc.

I still haven't taken a formal hunter safety course, but I'm lucky enough to have a Mentor who is able to fill me in on all the things I would have otherwise missed.

Actually, ME requires a specific bow hunting course if you want to hunt with a bow, which I do next year, so I'm planning on taking a MA course as they are 1) free and 2) one day instead of ME's two day courses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Agreed, I too like this law for the same reasons you cited Jamz.

Myself I don't have a mentor toward this stuff so classes would be helpful.
I plan/hope to take all five of the courses offered, not because I ever expect to be a 'trapper' but it would be fun to learn about as much and it would add to my admittedly eclectic base of knowledge. Also they give out those cool patches upon graduation and I'm a nut for awards & trophies. :p
The fact that they are all currently free courses is a bonus!

[quote="MassWildLife Hunter Education]
SPECIALTY COURSES


Bowhunter Education - Massachusetts offers the Bowhunter Education curriculum developed by the National Bowhunter Education Foundation which is accepted in other jurisdictions mandating the successful completion of a bowhunter education course. Courses are a minimum of 8 hours of instruction and are designed for both the experienced and novice hunter. Course topics include the selection of equipment, safety, ethics, bowhunting methods, and care and handling of game. Students may bring their archery equipment to class to obtain advice on its use and care. Most are one-day weekend day courses.

Map, Compass & Survival Courses involve one weekend day (10 hrs.) divided between classroom and field exercises. Topics include instruction on wilderness survival, as well as the use of a compass and topographical map for land navigation. Due to the technical nature of the course, it is not recommended for anyone under the age of 12.

Black Powder Education - Courses include a minimum of 10 hours classroom instruction plus field work. Topics cover the selection of hunting equipment, state laws, the safe handling of muzzleloaders and powder storage. There is a voluntary live-fire segment to the program. A Certificate of Completion from the Basic Hunter Education course is a pre-requisite for all students under 18 years of age.

Trapper Education (Mandatory for all first-time trappers including Problem Animal Control (PAC) agents.) - This course includes both classroom work and field training. Students receive instruction on the Best Management Practices for trapping furbearers. The course covers basic techniques with a strong focus on the responsible treatment of animals, legal methods, safety, selectivity, and ethical trapper behavior.

Waterfowl Identification - This course is an 8-hour program. Its objective is to teach the identification of migratory waterfowl, but also covers the shooting characteristics of steel shot, hunting safely from boats, and the proper use of waders.
http://www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/dfwhuntr.htm
[/quote]

- Janq
 

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Pretty sure PA mandates you take a hunter safety course... At least I remember having to when I was 12. I think the various courses are pretty cool as an offering and wouldn't mind taking them again for the reasons you listed Janq. I think PA needs to be more active in hunter safety/reg programs instead of just jacking up license costs every year!

Probably didn't need to empty the mag but this was the doe I got this year. :p My boot does a poor representation of scale, but that sucker had an inch of fat on her!

 

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this sounds like a good law

i remember turning 12 and taking the HSC back east before i could go deer, goose and duck hunting

when i joined the trap/skeet club i needed to show proof i had previous safty training
 

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DJ 9iron said:
Probably didn't need to empty the mag but this was the doe I got this year. :p My boot does a poor representation of scale, but that sucker had an inch of fat on her!
This is why I am against hunting. You need to dump a mag into a deer to get it to drop :(, what about making a clean kills. not blasting at a animal as it runs by.

next to cops, hunter are some of the worst shooters I have seen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Update:

I've taken and passed the Hunter Ed course then moved on next to 'Bowhunting Education' and most recently 'Map, Compass & Survival' which I very much enjoyed and excelled at in both the classroom and out in the woods portions (50/50 instruction time). In fact I did so well in this course that two of the instructors approached me individually during class and asked if I would be interested in participating as a volunteer instructor trainee. At the end of class during 'graduation' the courses instructor team leader stated publicly that as I took so well this she'd expect me to volunteer toward becoming an instructor. Later she approached me with an application form toward volunteering as an instructor for this program in general and encouraged me to do so toward MCS in specific. That was a month ago and I'm very seriously thinking I may do it as it would be another challenge, fun thing to do in general, and it would add yet another corner to my quit eclectic background and professional resume. FWIW 15 yrs. of competitive cross country, 8+yrs. of paintball in woods, lots of reading in my own time just out of general curiosity, and a well known good instinct for direction (I rarely ever get lost or can't find my way back from some place) really came in to play for me during this specific class. It was the first class where I didn't feel like a total novice. Beyond that it was to the most informative course I've taken yet in the sense of this is stuff most anyone could/might use in their real life some day. A literal lifetime of watching adventure shows like Marlon Perkins on 'Wild Kingdom' and the current Survivor Man show and knowledge absorbed & stored from that made this class for me that much more easier and my self useful overall to the class at large, even as I'm a city boy by nature and breeding. Although even in the city survival skills, methods, technology, and mindset (will to not give up, and die) is just as applicable.

Anyway I learned a shit ton of stuff from this class and confirmed that if I'm dumped in a foreign wood and given a map with compass I can succesfully find my way to way points and then to a final 'base' zone unfamiliar to me...and not require assistance, rescue aid, or even pass out as did many of the others in my group. I was the first student to make it back out of the woods to which I pretty much ran like it was a cross country course. Paintball has taught me well how to identify things in nature that are not natural in shape or color which was a key part of the course navigation final exam. Meanwhile other students in the class required instructors to help them get out of the wood/find required waypoints/get unlost including one person got turned around exiting wrongly from the place where he entered(!), another required became exhausted within an hour (the course terrain was not flat, bushwhacked, nor all that easy) and an instructor called in for a truck to take him out of the woods, an instructors teen daughter who was there as a volunteer instructor trainee on her first day was escorting a duo of students and she wound up passing out from the heat and being heloed out of the woods by the students (!), and others took as long as twice the time I did to clear the same 2mi. sq. course. This stuff was not easy it was challenging and being of/from the country as based on results with my own class participants does not mean much.

I did wind up meeting a very cool survival guy via class from NH who has been doing this stuff for his whole life living in the woods as a kid with his own dad and now being a bit of a codger has done everything from logging to deep sea materials recovery to for fun having hiked across Death Valley, he says twice. He's trained he says under a guy named Mors Koshanski who supposedly is the man of this kind of thing for real life survival as opposed to sport. This guy took me aside and showed me a bunch more crap like how to make in minutes a bed out of found sticks and leaves as well as a shelter. This was covered in class as well but the methods they used required as quoted to me upon asking in class ___ 8 hrs.___ or more. Meanwhile my guy, 'Jack', made a man sized wood frame shelter and a bed to go with it within 15 minutes using nothing more than a fixed blade knife. Ironically the exact same one featured & discussed at the Crowbarn two weeks ago as sourced from Sweden. the Jack dude gave me his contact info with number and said to buzz him if ever I needed any more info or reference material ideas. I'm telling you I l really took to this class and had much fun with it.

As a side note if James Kim had known just half the stuff we covered in this class he would have survived his ordeal and/or would have made it to help alive. Some people in OT scoffed when I had then said to scavenge the car for fuels toward a fire (i.e. brake fluid) and to use everything including the headliner and headrest covers to make ad hoc. cover for ones feet & body when in snow. Well FFWD to this class and guess what gets discussed and reviewed by the instructors. Yep you guessed it. I sat there thinking to myself; 'A brutha would survive!'. :)
We were taught signs of panic and how to combat that. What most commonly lost people do that makes it more difficult for them to be located and/or results in their death. Death was emphasized alot in this class because well bottom line you can only go 3 days without water even as you can last as long as 3 weeks without food, with of course resulting pain and much in the way of general discomfort & mental degradation.
I highly suggest this course for anyone even remotely interested in survival even if it's just watching Survivor Man on TV. Of the courses I've taken thus far I'd easily say this was the most general life usable while it was Hunters Ed. that definitely was the most difficult in so far as information qunatity to be absorbed.

My next courses I'm registered & confirmed for are 'Trapper Education' followed by 'Waterfowl Identification'. After that allI have left is Black Powder Ed. to round things out. I am planning to take MCS again just because I enjoyed it so much. I bought a topo map and using what I learned in class have been working with my 4 yr. old daughter, 'BabyJanq', to teach her about what a compass is, the cardinal directions, and that reading a map can be useful toward getting from A to B to Z. She can only handle so much so I'm dumbing ti down greatly at this stage. But if I have anything to say about it my kids will be survival minded survivors as well just like their pops. :p

I've updated the links in my OP to reflect recent updates and URL changes made by MA Wilidlife to their site toward these courses.
MA, VT, NH, and CT residents keep in mind this stuff is open to anyone and all. It's funded dually by the MA tax base and the Federal govt. If you despise paying taxes and/or don't understand where you tax money goes or have an issue with waste/pork then get your butt into these classes as this is IMHO an excellent opportunity to put your tax money where your mouth with the only cost being only several hours of your time and some gas money to get there.

- Janq

CN: I very much enjoy the MA Wildlife free education program and have been telling my friends and neighbors and anyone that will listen that this program exists, and it is as based on attendances thus far and how quickly classes fill up during registration is extremely popular and under staffed in so far as number of instructors. For example yesterday I received as per the program norm an announcement against my having preregistered toward the Waterfowl ID course that I've been trying to get into since January. I called this morning to register knowing that seats get filled quick. I asked about availability and was told there will be only one course for this in 2007 with just 25 seats available and that I am the 6th confirmed attendee. It's not even been 24 hrs. yet! I went ahead and registered my neighbor as well as we were talking about this just last weekend and he'd expressed an interest. So now it's up to 8 confirmed attendees. Register ASAP or you will lose out and have to wait until who knows when in 2008. Every class I've taken thus far have literally been at capacity.
 

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I feel its a great thing and I went though the Michigan HSC when I was 13 or 14. Here they don't have the different classes, its all rolled into one, but doesn't go as indepth as they do there, but it is a 4 day class at our sportsmen's club. They get to shoot archery, trap, and do some rifle shooting in the class, and also get to track a blood trail to show them what to expect to find.

All in all I feel its a great thing and that anyone thats going to be hunting should take it.
 

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thats bad ass!


reminds me of the old scout days

had to navigate the gettysburg battle field with map & compass
 

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I think you'll like the trapper coruse. Most of the stuff can be applied to the MCS classes,survival food with out a weapon.
 

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Ducman said:
This is why I am against hunting. You need to dump a mag into a deer to get it to drop :(, what about making a clean kills. not blasting at a animal as it runs by.

next to cops, hunter are some of the worst shooters I have seen.
I didn't need to dump a 5 round "mag" to get it to drop. I did anyway.
The buck I killed the previous week was a 1 shot kill to the heart. Besides this doe, I've never needed to shoot a deer more than once.
 
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