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Discussion Starter #1
If I understood other posts correctly, the standard rule for transporting a firearm is unloaded, out of reach, in a lockable box separate from the ammunition (which is also in a lockable box).

That works fine for a car, and might even be workable in a truck.

But how would I transport a firearm, especially a rifle or long gun, on a motorcycle? There's no place that I could put it and be 'out of reach'; even under the passenger seat is technically within reach, forget about a tank or tail bag. And I wonder how long it would take to generate a parade of police cars behind me if I were cruising down the expressway with a AR-15 slung across my back.

The long rifle part is kinda facetious -- if I'm shooting big guns, I'm taking the wagon -- but the pistol part isn't.

I know the real answer is 'check your local regulations', but it seems the LEOs don't know the full letter of the law (who could?), so citing the regs at them usually just pisses them off more.

Just looking for a common sense answer that won't get me bodyslammed off my Suzuki at a traffic stop.
 

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here is what i was able to find quickly:


http://www.packing.org/state/ohio/#statecar_law


Car/Gun law summary
Date updated: Apr 2, 2007 @ 11:19 pm

Individuals with a license to carry a concealed handgun may transport a loaded handgun if:

The loaded handgun is in a holster on the person’s person.
The loaded handgun is in a closed case, bag, box, or other container that is in plain sight and that has a lid, a cover, or a closing mechanism with a zipper, snap, or buckle, which lid, cover, or closing mechanism must be opened for a person to gain access to the handgun.
The loaded handgun is securely encased by being stored in a closed, locked glove compartment or in a case that is locked.
The most significant change to Ohio Law from HB347 is that you no longer "must" carry your firearm in the vague definition of "plain sight". However, it is important to understand that any time a firearm is not locked up it must be on your person and in a holster. You may not jam it in between your seat and center console, nor may you store it on your dash. Openly carrying a loaded handgun in a vehicle requires a concealed handgun license.
Other related sections of the revised code can be found here:

2923.16 (2) If the person is transporting or has a loaded handgun in a motor vehicle in a manner authorized under division (E)(1) of this section, knowingly remove or attempt to remove the loaded handgun from the holster, case, bag, box, container, or glove compartment, knowingly grasp or hold the loaded handgun, or knowingly have contact with the loaded handgun by touching it with the person’s hands or fingers while the motor vehicle is being operated on a street, highway, or public property unless the person removes, attempts to remove, grasps, holds, or has the contact with the loaded handgun pursuant to and in accordance with directions given by a law enforcement officer;

(3) If the person is the driver or an occupant of a motor vehicle that is stopped as a result of a traffic stop or a stop for another law enforcement purpose or is the driver or an occupant of a commercial motor vehicle that is stopped by an employee of the motor carrier enforcement unit for the purposes defined in section 5503.34 of the Revised Code, and if the person is transporting or has a loaded handgun in the motor vehicle or commercial motor vehicle in any manner, fail to do any of the following that is applicable:

(a) If the person is the driver or an occupant of a motor vehicle stopped as a result of a traffic stop or a stop for another law enforcement purpose, fail to promptly inform any law enforcement officer who approaches the vehicle while stopped that the person has been issued a license or temporary emergency license to carry a concealed handgun and that the person then possesses or has a loaded handgun in the motor vehicle;

(b) If the person is the driver or an occupant of a commercial motor vehicle stopped by an employee of the motor carrier enforcement unit for any of the defined purposes, fail to promptly inform the employee of the unit who approaches the vehicle while stopped that the person has been issued a license or temporary emergency license to carry a concealed handgun and that the person then possesses or has a loaded handgun in the commercial motor vehicle.

(4) If the person is the driver or an occupant of a motor vehicle that is stopped as a result of a traffic stop or a stop for another law enforcement purpose and if the person is transporting or has a loaded handgun in the motor vehicle in any manner, knowingly fail to remain in the motor vehicle while stopped or knowingly fail to keep the person’s hands in plain sight at any time after any law enforcement officer begins approaching the person while stopped and before the law enforcement officer leaves, unless the failure is pursuant to and in accordance with directions given by a law enforcement officer;

(5) If the person is the driver or an occupant of a motor vehicle that is stopped as a result of a traffic stop or a stop for another law enforcement purpose, if the person is transporting or has a loaded handgun in the motor vehicle in a manner authorized under division (E)(1) of this section, and if the person is approached by any law enforcement officer while stopped, knowingly remove or attempt to remove the loaded handgun from the holster, case, bag, box, container, or glove compartment, knowingly grasp or hold the loaded handgun, or knowingly have contact with the loaded handgun by touching it with the person’s hands or fingers in the motor vehicle at any time after the law enforcement officer begins approaching and before the law enforcement officer leaves, unless the person removes, attempts to remove, grasps, holds, or has contact with the loaded handgun pursuant to and in accordance with directions given by the law enforcement officer;

(6) If the person is the driver or an occupant of a motor vehicle that is stopped as a result of a traffic stop or a stop for another law enforcement purpose and if the person is transporting or has a loaded handgun in the motor vehicle in any manner, knowingly disregard or fail to comply with any lawful order of any law enforcement officer given while the motor vehicle is stopped, including, but not limited to, a specific order to the person to keep the person’s hands in plain sight.
The Ohio Supreme Court has not defined the term “plain sight” precisely in the context of carrying a concealed handgun. However, in other contexts, courts have generally held that the term “plain sight” is a common sense term that means clearly visible or unobstructed.

If you are stopped by law enforcement, you must comply with all lawful orders given to you by an officer. You must remain in the vehicle, and you must keep your hands in plain sight when the officer approaches unless you are told to do otherwise by the officer. You may not have contact or attempt to have contact with the handgun unless told to do so by the officer.

Merely having, or attempting to have, contact with the handgun is a felony.

Federal Law on the Transportation of Firearms. Title 18 U.S.C. Section 926A


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more:


Must inform Law Enforcement when Carrying
Date updated: Aug 23, 2005 @ 10:10 pm

Ohio's Concealed Carry Law makes it Mandatory to notify a police officer that you are carrying a concealed handgun and have a license to do so.

This law will apply to you even if you are merely a passenger in a motor vehicle. The officer may or may not ask you to produce your license and may or may not ask to take possession of your firearm for the duration of the traffic stop. The law specifically prohibits the officer from keeping your firearm if you are released.

Vital: During a traffic stop you should never make any movement that could be considered reaching for or touching your firearm. Besides the common sense reasons, if you are charged with touching your firearm at any time during a traffic stop the charges are a felony.

Sec. 2923.126.

(A) If a licensee is the driver or an occupant of a motor vehicle that is stopped as the result of a traffic stop or a stop for another law enforcement purpose and if the licensee is transporting or has a loaded handgun in the motor vehicle at that time, the licensee shall promptly inform any law enforcement officer who approaches the vehicle while stopped that the licensee has been issued a license or temporary emergency license to carry a concealed handgun and that the licensee currently possesses or has a loaded handgun; the licensee shall comply with lawful orders of a law enforcement officer given while the motor vehicle is stopped, shall remain in the motor vehicle while stopped, and shall keep the licensee's hands in plain sight while any law enforcement officer begins approaching the licensee while stopped and before the officer leaves, unless directed otherwise by a law enforcement officer; and the licensee shall not knowingly remove, attempt to remove, grasp, or hold the loaded handgun or knowingly have contact with the loaded handgun by touching it with the licensee's hands or fingers, in any manner in violation of division (E) of section 2923.16 of the Revised Code, while any law enforcement officer begins approaching the licensee while stopped and before the officer leaves. If a law enforcement officer otherwise approaches a person who has been stopped for a law enforcement purpose, if the person is a licensee, and if the licensee is carrying a concealed handgun at the time the officer approaches, the licensee shall promptly inform the officer that the licensee has been issued a license or temporary emergency license to carry a concealed handgun and that the licensee currently is carrying a concealed handgun.

Sec. 2923.126.

(A) A licensee who has been issued a license under section 2923.125 or 2923.1213 of the Revised Code may carry a concealed handgun anywhere in this state if the licensee also carries a valid license and valid identification when the licensee is in actual possession of a concealed handgun.


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Carrying without a Permit/License
Date updated: Apr 2, 2007 @ 11:29 pm

Ohio's new concealed carry law has unfortunately removed every affirmative defense from the law. It is a criminal offense to carry a concealed firearm without a license or temporary emergency license to do so. The former law that provided affirmative defenses expired on April 8th, 2004 and is no longer available.

There is no state law that prohibits someone not otherwise prohibited from owning a firearm from openly carrying that firearm. Further, with the adoption of HB347 statewide preemption has theoretically eliminated the authority of anyone other than the State of Ohio to enact firearms legislation other than zoning rules. If preemption survives legal challenges, as it should, then those laws which local governments have enacted shall no longer be enforceable.

Prior to the enactment of HB347 conventional wisdom suggested that open carry in Ohio was risky at best since random communities had enacted misdemeanor charges that could be levied against someone.

Carrying a firearm openly in Ohio still comes with the risk of arrest since many local police departments are unaware of the fact that the act is not prohibited by state law. If you choose to carry openly in Ohio understand that doing so comes with moderate risk of arrest.

Further, remember that carrying a loaded firearm in a vehicle, even if you do so in plain sight, requires a concealed handgun license.


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Peaceable journey law summary
Date updated: Apr 2, 2007 @ 11:47 pm

Ohio's new concealed carry law includes only one peaceable journey exclusion for school safety zones. However, the section of law is so poorly written it is virtually impossible to comply with the requirements.

Ohio's new statewide preemption laws, should they prevail court challenges pending in Cuyahoga County, will make all firearms laws uniform statewide.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If I'm reading that correctly, to carry a loaded handgun in a vehicle you need a CCW permit. Without a CCW, you can not carry a loaded handgun in a vehicle at all.

Doesn't really address the conditions that must be met when transporting an unloaded weapon. Unloaded open carry of a long gun sounds like a bad idea then, even if it looks like it's technically legal.

Thanks for the info (even if it gave me a headache trying to read it).
 

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Pretty much never should you have a loaded firearm stored in a vehicle that is not under your direct control, e.g. 'carried' and thus not 'stored'.
A stored firearm in a vehicle should be in some way locked (not just disabled i.e. bolt removed) and it's magazine emptied. The ammo needs to be locked as well although in a separate container that you should check your own state & community laws for definition to that degree.

The 'carry' of a long gun (rifle or shotgun) is in most states not allowed and same applies to 'carry' in specific within a vehicle, which can though across the board be 'stored'.
The only exceptions to allowed 'carry' of a long gun in a vehicle that I can think of toward that are GA and I believe AK too.

BTW a 'vehicle' is any conveyance be it motorized or not and that includes bicycles as well as a horse, although IIRC some rural states do allow carry and/or 'transport' though not 'storage' of a long gun by horse.
Once again check applicable state & local laws to be 100% sure.

- Janq
 
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