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Nose Nuggets said:
i thought this was what the Germans used before the MG42.
No this was a only 5,000 made, production paratrooper model they wanted to test, but never made full scale production. So basically this is a semi-auto copy or conversion.
 

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Fanatical Feline
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Oh Jesus why did you have to show me this...

This is my all time favorite WW2 weapon and I have always dreamed of them makeing a semi auto one.... Now im going to have to look at one of these when I need to save money the most. ;)

Had nothing to do with the MG-42 but it is kind of the father of the M-60. There was under 7,000 made but they are so complicated that it took to long to build them.


aw... shit 10,000K well... I guess thats good for me that I will never get one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What gets me about watching that video is how controllable it is. The muzzle brake must be very effective on what is essentially a .30-06, the German 7.92.
 

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Fanatical Feline
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MP-44....

I hate you ;)

The break on them has to be good.. thats an 8mm! I could not lift my arm for most of this last week from 150 rounds of the 8ball over the weekend.

went and got 800 something rounds of 8mm today from a pawn shop, there in large spam cans. yay!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
fatcat said:
MP-44....

I hate you ;)

The break on them has to be good.. thats an 8mm! I could not lift my arm for most of this last week from 150 rounds of the 8ball over the weekend.

went and got 800 something rounds of 8mm today from a pawn shop, there in large spam cans. yay!
Unfortunately on all the guns shown in the German website above, the ATF ruled they were machine guns (even though they are semi-auto) and cannot be imported. That is too bad. But, there has been steadily building interest in these guns for what, 50 years? Now 2 different companies are building them. if I had to guess, they German company will license a US manufacturer and you'll see these available at more realistic prices.

As an aside, I had numerous emails with Estes Adams at fg42.net. He is one of the partners of fg42.us. Last summer I was ready to send off a deposit of $1K for the FG42 as it was going to be ~$4K. A stretch financially but I've easily got that in old hobby crap I can get rid of. Then they announced $10K. I am sure it is real nice, but it won't be the only choice long term.

I'll have one of these someday & I'll bet for a lot less than $4K too! Now if they chambered it in .30-06!
 

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Negative Nancy
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I was actually thinking about this this morning on my way to work. What i came to the realization is that the soon to be Kel Tec RFB does basically everything the FG did (for semi auto civvie versions anyway) but without looking nearly as cool doing it.

it kinda made me sad :(
 

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Id rather have it in 8mm! I got 880 rounds in tuna cans for 120 bucks! 30-06 is much much more and it always come on clips... hm, I dont get to say clips very much... clips clips clips clips clips..

Yes is is slighty corrosive but just windex the barrel and your good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
einzelherz said:
it kinda made me sad :(
Look at it another way, 5 years ago could you have even conceived one would be available to buy at all? This is indeed an amazing era that we live in.

You can get if you have the money -

A clone of a 1969 Camaro made on all new tooling. It is dimensionally identical to the original and constructed entirely from parts made recently, not new old stock. It has a new car warranty & passes emissions.

An FG42, MP44, MP40, Colt Lightning pump rifle, Winchester 1887 lever action shotgun, Ruger Vaquero, Kahr M1 Carbine, & on & on are available now. The Lightning I can understand as it is a very handy rifle. But, an 1887 Winchester? Yep, shipping now and being snapped up.

Exact replica gear of the US soldiers landing on Omaha Beach, 1944. Exact replica gear of the defending German soldiers. Right down to the combat spats on the US troops and the bread tins the German troops had. Some of the gear like the field jackets are being purchased by regular people not just reenactors because they are so functional.

Samurai swords made exactly as they were 500 years ago. Not just one firm making them but dozens.

An exact replica of the Me-262 WWII German jet made on new tooling with new engines and certified by the FAA!

The list goes on & on.

What is also amazing is that the means of production are no longer confined to the high capital firms. Desktop CNC is now common, & further, there are entire websites devoted to building your own CNC machines from parts off eBay never intended for those uses. You can buy a CNC plasma cutter for under $10K or build your own 1/3 of that with guidelines of the same websites. Accuracy is on par with water jet & laser cutters. You can also send your own CAD files off to a 3rd party service bureau and have parts made in small lots just like you were a big company. There is enough competition that little guys can go into production on niche items and not be croaked on tooling costs.

3D parts prototyping (stereo lithography / SLA) is no longer confined to large firms either. I have a friend who bought an SLA machine for himself and it was well under $6K! He makes custom parts like logo badges & oddball bezels for musclecars & motorcycle restorations. He uses a durable & stable resin that allows it to be chromed via vapor deposition so it looks just like the original metal part when completed. Further, the base resins used in these machines are improving on virtually a monthly basis and in the very near future it is not too much of a stretch to suppose that parts right out of the machine will be usable in exactly the same way as if they'd been cast or molded in a precision die. In other words, production quality parts from a machine in your hobby room. Replicators used to be the sole province of Star Trek.

Gentlemen, we are on the cusp of a radical transformation in manufacturing. The next 5 years are going to be frankly, amazing! Really, the future is here right now. All this leads me to not be too sad on not being able to lay hands on an FG42 today. Tomorrow I may be able to make it myself!
 
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