12 gauge Slug Wound Profiles (56k beware)
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12 gauge Slug Wound Profiles (56k beware)

This is a discussion on 12 gauge Slug Wound Profiles (56k beware) within the Shotguns forums, part of the Gun Forums category; i barrowed this from the basement over at SW: Taken from http://www.tacticalshotgun.ca/ballistics_shotgun.html Before you begin to read this realize that all of these shots were ...

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  1. #1
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) MrMcCrackin's Avatar
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    12 gauge Slug Wound Profiles (56k beware)

    i barrowed this from the basement over at SW:


    Taken from http://www.tacticalshotgun.ca/ballistics_shotgun.html

    Before you begin to read this realize that all of these shots were taken from a known distance and angle into bare Ordinance Gelatin is a controlled enviroment.

    This does not take into consideration the effects clothing, weather, range, tempurature, cover, or body structure.

    YWMV, IANAL, not valid in Guam or Puerto Rico, only driven on Sundays by a little old lady going to church and back.


    Reduced Recoil Slug


    2¾ Remington Reduced Recoil 1oz Slug shot out of an 18 inch barreled remington 870 marine magnum


    Total penetration of the load was longer than our gelatin phographing light fixture. As a result we photographed each block seperately and spliced the two together for the first photograph. Here is a photo of the first block.


    The second gelatin block showing the slug and wad material.


    Closeup of the slug. You can how it has yawed slightly, however the proximity and similar orientation of the wad suggesting that tumbling of the slug is unlikely as it travels through the target media. Because the slug is as wide as it is tall, it is difficult to determine tumbling via examination of the permenant wound channel.


    Cross section of the 1st gelatin block approximately 8.5 inches in. Visible are the large tears of the temporary stretch cavity.


    Slight perspective on the cross section.

    Closeup of the 3 lobed tears.

    Wow! If you can live with the approximate 15 to 20 yard decrease in maximum range (85 yards as compared to approximately 100 with a full power slug), this load exhibits phenomenal penetrating capability...especially when you consider the projectile's poor sectional density.

    We highly recommend reduced recoil slugs for animals that weigh less than 500lbs, as they certainly are easier on the shoulder in practice and as such you are likely to practice more and feel more confident in your ability to hit. In our patterning excercises we also found these slugs to be very accurate across a wide variety of guns.

    ****NOTE**** Based on experience with a yearling cow we were requested by it's owner to shoot, we DO NOT RECOMMEND REDUCED RECOIL SLUGS FOR DANGEROUS GAME OR ANIMALS THAT WEIGH MORE THAN 500lbs.


    Reduced Recoil Slug (14" Barrel)


    2¾ Remington Reduced Recoil 1oz Slug shot out of a 14 inch barreled remington 870 hybrid. Our light table is not long enough to capture the full tract, thus the composite photograph.


    As with most slug testing, total penetration of the load was longer than our gelatin phographing light fixture. As a result we photographed each block seperately and spliced the two together for the first photograph. Here is a photo of the first block.

    The first block rotated 90 degrees, illustrating with slightly more clarity the temporary stretch cavity.


    The second gelatin block showing the slug and wad material. In comparison to the same load fired out of an 18 inch barreled remington 870, the 4 inches of barrel length missing effects an overall penetration reduction of approximately 2.5 inches.


    Closeup of the slug....in this case the cardboard wadding wound up pressed into the back of the slug.


    Perspective on the entrance hole.


    The slug and wad combination extracted from the gelatin.


    Closeup of the recovered slug.


    Closeup of the recovered slug. Similarly to the same slug load fired from an 18 inch barreled 870, there was little to no slug expansion evident.

    Evidence of the slightly lower muzzle velocity when fired from a barrel 4 inches shorter than our standard 18 inch test barrel is approximately 2.5 inches of total penetration reduction. Are the benefits of the reduced recoil slug and a short barreled shotgun worth this type of performance penalty? Our experience has been that on animals weighing less than 500 lbs there is nothing lacking at all in this slug/barrel length combination.

    We highly recommend reduced recoil slugs, as they certainly are easier on the shoulder in practice and as such you are likely to practice more and feel more confident in your ability to hit. In our patterning excercises we also found these slugs to be very accurate across a wide variety of guns.

    ****NOTE**** Based on experience with a yearling cow we were requested by it's owner to shoot, we DO NOT RECOMMEND REDUCED RECOIL SLUGS FOR DANGEROUS GAME OR ANIMALS THAT WEIGH MORE THAN 500lbs.
    Last edited by MrMcCrackin; 06-12-2007 at 07:50 PM.

  2. #2
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) MrMcCrackin's Avatar
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    Foster Slug


    Composite photograph illustrating total penetration of a 1600fps winchester foster styled slug.


    This photograph illustrates the deflection of the slug as it travelled through the target media...likely caused by the high degree of slug deformation observed.


    The slug only barely penetrated into the second block.


    A fragment of the slug was recovered at the very tail of the first block.


    Closeup of fragment and exit hole in the first block.


    Closeup of remaining slug...only about an inch into the second block.


    Perspective on the entrance hole.

    Tested was a 2¾ inch Winchester regular foster styled slug fired from an 18 inch barreled Remington 870 Marine Magnum.

    A 1 oz soft lead slug blazing out at approximately 1600 fps yielded some surprising opservations in our ordinance gelatin. What makes the results surprising is when they are compared with those of the reduced recoil loads; the higher velocity of the regular loads (such as this one by winchester) produce less penetration as far more energy is invested in deformation and deflection of the slug.

  3. #3
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) MrMcCrackin's Avatar
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    Brenneke R10 Slug


    Composited combined tracts of a 2¾ Brenneke R10 slug fired from an 18 inch barreled Remington 870 Marine Magnum.


    As with most of our slug testing, total penetration of the load was longer than our gelatin phographing light fixture. As a result we photographed each block seperately and spliced the two together for the first photograph. Here is a photo of the first block.


    Rotating the block to emphasis the temporary stretch cavity, note that it is significantly more developed and longer as compared to the regular foster style slugs we've tested.


    The second gelatin block showing the slug and affixed wad.


    Exposing the slug.


    Slug detail.


    Perspective on entrance.


    Entrance hole.


    Slug and wad combination as recovered from the gelatin.


    Significant expansion of the slug at it's head.


    Detailed photograph of expanded slug head.

    Brenneke slugs are frequently discussed as having significantly superior penetration characteristics as compared to other high velocity slugs. Our gelatin testing support these claims and uncovers some other interesting performance characteristics that merit consideration when selecting a slug.

    The nose design of these slugs is such that very controlled expansion occurs with the slug retaining 97% of it's original mass. The slight expansion and geometry of the expanded head are such that as the slug travels through target media it cuts a larger diameter wound tract. As compared to most regular foster styled slugs cast/swaged from soft lead, the brennekes are manufactured from a harder alloy that largly accounts for the slug holding together better at the higher velocites. When pushed in the neigourhood of 1600 fps, the softer lead slugs tend to deform significantly; losing their penetrating potential as the slug either expands so much as to present huge cross sectional area or breaks up into smaller, less efficient fragments. As the brennekes hold together better, they are a more appropriate slug when deep penetration in dangerous game is required.

    International Frangible Slug


    2¾ International Frangible slug fired from an 18 inch barreled Remington 870 Marine Magnum.

    Primarily designed as a non lead training round with minimal riccochet or spatter potential, these rounds are designed to disintegrate on impact.


    Perspective on the entrance hole.


    Closeup of the entrance hole.

    Likely an excellent load for those concerned with over-penetration in a crowded urban environment while still needing the relative accuracy associated with a single projectile, we'd have no reservations endorsing this load as a medium range precision 12 gauge round.

    This being said, poor penetration charracteristics of the slug should be taken into serious consideration.

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