Could someone explain ammo 'Grain'?
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Could someone explain ammo 'Grain'?

This is a discussion on Could someone explain ammo 'Grain'? within the New Members forums, part of the Gun Forums category; My understanding is that the lower the grain, the more energy a bullet will have. I don't know the how and why of it though....

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  1. #1
    Shemoves's Avatar
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    Could someone explain ammo 'Grain'?

    My understanding is that the lower the grain, the more energy a bullet will have. I don't know the how and why of it though.

  2. #2
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) Blindeye_03's Avatar
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    I thought the grain # = weight of the bullet? or something to that effect.

  3. #3
    Shemoves's Avatar
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    Hmm, well clearly I have no idea what I am talking about. I guess I should just googalate it

    Edit: And...google failed me.
    Last edited by Shemoves; 10-30-2007 at 01:50 PM.

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  6. #4
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) Blindeye_03's Avatar
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    I looked on wiki but found nothing, I am sure someone here will know for sure...

    I even asked my roommate and he couldnt even give me a straight answer.

    Im pretty sure its bullet weight though. Heavier bullets have more of an impact at longer ranges, where as lighter bullets have less energy and less "punch" at longer ranges.

  7. #5
    Shemoves's Avatar
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    lol. perhaps it's like asking someone to define 'horsepower.'

  8. #6
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) Blindeye_03's Avatar
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    lol thats easy!

    1 horsepower = 745 Watts .

    haha...

  9. #7
    Shemoves's Avatar
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    or > 12 parsecs.

  10. #8
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) Janq's Avatar
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    FUCK!!!

    I typed a long answer for you with multiple sources to reference and what do i do?!!
    I accidentally clicked the close tab button in FF.

    Argh!

    - Janq

  11. #9
    Shemoves's Avatar
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    That sux, I've pulled done that before.

    you<yourself

    Thanks for trying though

  12. #10
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) Janq's Avatar
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    Shemoves,

    Most simply the term 'grains' refers to the weight of the bullet as a singular component amongst a round overall.


    http://www.hunter-ed.com/mi/course/c...cartridges.htm

    To be clear this term is not specific to the other components of the round such as the casing, primer, or propellant powder.
    For example when you see reference to 230 grain .45 ACP (a pistol round) or 55 grain .223 (a rifle round) the grain reference is singularly toward the weight of the bullet component itself as part of the round as a whole assemblage.

    Additional information sources are the following:

    'Components of a Round of Ammo: Target Shooting Practice Tips for the Gun Range'
    http://sports.expertvillage.com/videos/ammunition.htm

    'Bullets: Calibers Explained. Everything you've ever wanted to know.'
    http://www.gunatics.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1657

    As to effectiveness of a given round, in grains, as compared to another you might stop here amongst other reference sources;

    'HandLoads.com bullet performance analyzer'
    http://www.gunatics.com/forums/showthread.php?t=720

    As to energy there are a number of conditions one would have to take into account such as the type of bullet used (FMJ or JHP), the type of target the bullet is intended to hit (flesh, stone, wood, metal), and what specifically is the intended result be it to ding, damage, disable or in the case of a living thing wound, stop, or kill.

    For more info on that if you have energy and a mind for heady reading on the subject then go here;

    'Kinetic Pulse: A study in bullet impact'
    http://www.xmission.com/~fractil/math/kp.html

    Additonally the term grains is also used to indicate specific weight of gunpowder. But that only becomes applicable in knowledge when discussing reloading ammunition, not toward commercially produced and sold ammo.

    "A grain (symbol: gr) is a unit of mass now equal to exactly 64.79891 milligrams, in all English mass and weight systems (avoirdupois, Apothecaries’ and troy).

    An avoirdupois ounce is equal to 437.5 grains, whereas a troy ounce is equal to 480 grains. With the differing number of ounces in their respective pounds, an avoirdupois pound is 7,000 grains, whereas a troy pound is 5,760 grains. There have been other English pounds with round sizes in grains...
    Grains are currently used in the United States and Canada[1] to measure the mass of bullets and gunpowder, and scales for handloading measure in grains; bullets are generally measured in increments of 1 grain, gunpowder in increments of 0.1 grains."
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grain_(measure)

    A lengthy reply but I hope this answers your question in full.

    - Janq

    P.S. - Tomorrow I'm going to move this to the Newbie forum area as it's a good question that no doubt others have had if not will have.

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