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Helpful things for CCW.

This is a discussion on Helpful things for CCW. within the CCW Conceal Carry forums, part of the Gun Forums category; Since I don't want to threadjack Janq's thread regarding Carrying a Weapon in condition 3, I figured I'd stat my own thread about things that ...

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Thread: Helpful things for CCW.

  1. #1
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) mwink822's Avatar
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    Helpful things for CCW.

    Since I don't want to threadjack Janq's thread regarding Carrying a Weapon in condition 3, I figured I'd stat my own thread about things that one should do when training in order to be as proficient as possible with his/her chosen carry weapon.

    First and foremost, one should ALWAYS be familiar with his weapon. This is self explanatory. If one does not know the nomenclature and manual of arms of a 1911, he should not carry one until he knows as much. Same goes for any other pistol.

    Second, one should carry his weapon where ever and whenever legally permissible. The weapon should be carried in condition one, meaning a fully charged magazine loaded in addition to a round in the chamber, the manual safety (if any) should be engaged. If one cannot become comfortable carrying in this manner, he ought to reconsider carrying at all.

    Third, become proficient at the draw stroke. This does not simply mean getting the gun out of the holster quickly and pointed in the general direction of the target; rather it means getting the gun out of the holster quickly with a full firing grip on it and accurately "aimed" at the target (this means aimed with sights or aimed for a 'point shot' if the target is close in). So far as draw stroke is concerned, one should also learn to shoot from the retention position).

    Fourth, if you carry a weapon, you ought to carry at least one re-load (spare magazine or speed loader). There are a number of reasons for this, one is to top off after things cool off; one is to reload if you run dry in the course of defending yourself; and another is because some malfunctions require a magazine change to rectify the problem, whatever it may be.

    Fifth, train with the weapon yo carry, and do so often. Bear in mind that training need not necessarily be range time, however, it is highly encouraged. So far as training is concerned, it brings back memories of what my high school hockey coach preached to us; "Practice does not make perfect, practice makes permanent. Perfect practice makes perfect."

  2. #2
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) Nose Nuggets's Avatar
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    one thing i like to encorperate into EVERY draw stroke i take is the "get off the X" mentality. if you are presented with a situation in which you need to deploy your weapon, the first thing you should be doing as you pull your weapon is seeking cover. if all you do is train train train your drawstroke in a firing line booth or in the kicthen, and all you do is draw and aim; well guess what you are going to do when you actually deploy. draw, aim, and stand there like a moron. to break that habbit i just take a step on draw. dosent have to be much. if i am at the range, i will stand with my left side close to the left wall, draw, and take a step to the right.

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    10111011 mattxander12's Avatar
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    Didn't even think about that NN. I'm one of the "draw, aim, click" practicers.

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  6. #4
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) mwink822's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nose Nuggets
    one thing i like to encorperate into EVERY draw stroke i take is the "get off the X" mentality. if you are presented with a situation in which you need to deploy your weapon, the first thing you should be doing as you pull your weapon is seeking cover. if all you do is train train train your drawstroke in a firing line booth or in the kicthen, and all you do is draw and aim; well guess what you are going to do when you actually deploy. draw, aim, and stand there like a moron. to break that habbit i just take a step on draw. dosent have to be much. if i am at the range, i will stand with my left side close to the left wall, draw, and take a step to the right.
    Good point. This is something that was done while taking my CCW class, but has since fallen by the wayside in my normal training regimen as it is not something that is easy to do in a range lane, and I don't do a lot of draw practice at home, that's mostly snap cap dry firing.

  7. #5
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) Nose Nuggets's Avatar
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    imho the draw is the most important part. once i have my sight picture the firing part is muscle memory. its everything before and after the shooting that i am working on.

    also at the range i practice other things, 360 degree evaluation, standing idle in sul, mid-mag tac reloads, and of course encorperating all of these things into one drill.

    draw
    get off the x
    fire 3 shots
    sul
    360 eval
    tac reload (partial mag out, full mag in, partial mag in pocket. i only keep full mags in mag pouches, empty mags go to the ground)

    last time i went i had my friend load my mags with random snap caps. its not the BEST way to force a jam-clearing exercise but its the best i can come up with.


    edit: i want to reinforce the 360 evaluation bit. i know some people might glaze over the 360 part and just read 'evaluate situation'. the 360 part is key. i have seen more pistol videos suggest 180 left to right evaluation is "good" then suggest 360. that's horse shit. its not only adversaries you need to worry about either, being aware of everything going on around you will save lives. instead of freaking out when someone runs by you, you might have known they where already there. or if a cop sneaks up trying to detain you and you spin around last second and 'react'. all bad.
    Last edited by Nose Nuggets; 02-24-2009 at 06:16 PM.

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    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) mwink822's Avatar
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    ^
    Another good one to add to the list. I typically make it a habit to be aware of what is in front and off to the peripherals, I had never thought to do a 360* check, nor had I ever been told to do so when taking my CCW training in a course tought by a DE State Trooper.

  9. #7
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) mwink822's Avatar
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    Not necessarily CCW specific, but still relevant to use of a firearm in defensive context, be it a hand gun or some sort of long gun. If you leave your carry gun loaded at night as a night stand gun, and you require corrective lenses, keep a pair handy on the nightstand near the phone and gun so you can SEE what the hell is going on. A flashlight is also highly advisable for night time HD.

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    10111011 mattxander12's Avatar
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    Something I do at night ... I always put my handgun further away from my cell phone as possible within reason... I've been known to throw my cell phone (a.k.a. my daily alarm) across the room when I'm not even fully awake.

  11. #9
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) mwink822's Avatar
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    Make sure you know what movements you can and cannot make while carrying. Reaching up over your head with your gun side hand may result in you inadvertently flashing some steel. Also bending over may result in your cover garment hanging up on the grip of your gun.

  12. #10
    Gunatic Loyalist (Bow down) Janq's Avatar
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    NN is ON POINT!!!

    You have got to learn and _master_ the draw stroke, while doing so _on the move_.
    The Western style draw and stand there shoot it out method is largely fubar when rounds are coming down range back at you.

    With that take note of the BGs gun hand. If he is left handed then move to your right. If he is right handed then move to your left.
    Why? Because of basic human physiology. It requires more muscle and different as well as generally weaker shoulder muscle to sweep ones arm out than it does to close inward...and that directly affects the shooters accuracy in a real way. Remember this!

    Most definitely at time of draw one should be in movement and firing on the move...getting off the 'X' where as X represents not where you you are in the momentary current ('Y'). But most accurately X represents where you are and _were_ to the eye and perception of the adversary at any given moment in time and space. Simply do not be where the BG thinks you are or were.

    Excellent thread Wink and all five of his OP points are dead on.
    Especially the advisory to TRAIN!
    Skills definitely do degrade and quickly with time. Also train and do a wide number of _different_ things and not just go to the range and stand on the line shooting marksmanship/bullseye style at static targets. IRL Deebo moves around.

    - Janq

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